Trees on neighbouring properties

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What to dophoto of fig trees in Hindmarsh Park along Terralong Street

Most disputes between neighbours about trees involve overhanging branches or roots that affect or pose a potential risk to a neighbour's property.  If you are concerned about a tree on a neighbouring property, the best way to resolve the issue is to discuss it with your neighbour.  Your neighbour may not be aware that there is an issue, and in most cases will be willing to help you resolve your concerns.

If the owner's signature is not supplied on the Tree Management Application we can conduct an inspection however, the inspection will be limited to the applicants property.

There are no simple rules about who is responsible for the cost of pruning or cutting down a tree that affects neighbours - again it is best to discuss and come to an agreement about this.

It is not our role to intervene in neighbourhood disputes. If you cannot reach an agreeable solution with your neighbour your next option is take the issue to the Community Justice Centre (CJC) who provide a free mediation service to help resolve the problem. CJC regularly mediates tree disputes and has a high rate of success. Agreements are reached in around 80% of disputes CJC mediates.

If mediation is unsuccessful you can apply to the Land and Environment Court for an order under the Trees (Disputes Between Neighbours) Act 2006.

Who owns the neighbouring property?

If you want information about the owner of a neighbouring property you must complete and submit the Request for Information form stating the reasons for the request and the intended use of the information.